MORGAN YOUNG

Morgan Young, the principal at Young Ideas, has written, directed, and produced countless television, digital, radio, print and out of home commercials for clients ranging from Visa to Consumer Reports. 

Morgan’s work has consistently been among the most successful and creative in its field – moving and uniting public opinion firmly behind his clients’ causes and winning too-many-to-count basement dwelling, dust-collecting pieces of hardware better known as “creative awards.”

In 2015, Young Ideas’ work was put on permanent display in The Smithsonian’s American History Museum as part of their American Enterprise exhibit. Morgan's inclusion in the Smithsonian meant that he joined two of his grandparents, whom each have two pieces held at the Smithsonian.

In 2016, one of Young Ideas’ ads ran during the Super Bowl (albeit, only in California, but hey, we still think that’s pretty darn cool). Morgan once produced an HBO long format program with Tom Brokaw on nuclear terrorism and his work has been featured on MTV, Showtime, CNN and, in 2016, his work was even parodied by comedian Kathy Griffin.

Morgan has been profiled by Campaigns & Elections magazine and, on behalf of George Washington University, has lectured on public affairs advertising and mass marketing across the U.S. and in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic. Despite all that Latin America experience, his command of the Spanish language is still quite dreadful.

Prior to opening Young Ideas in 2008, Morgan served as the Senior Vice President and Creative Director of Goddard Claussen Strategic Advocacy. Earlier, Morgan served as the Vice President and Creative Services Director for Fenn Communications (formerly Fenn and King Communications), a Democratic campaign consulting firm based in Washington DC. 

Morgan holds an MA from The George Washington University and a BA from the University of Colorado. He lives in Boulder, Colorado with his two kids, one dog and seven guitars. There are rumors of a rogue cat as well, but neither he nor the cat will confirm knowledge of each other.